Martial Arts

    • Re: Martial Arts

      JC wrote:

      What exactly do you hope to accomplish by learning a martial art?


      Well I guess for self defence and just competency and confidence in fighting...just the comfort of knowing if I need to I can protect myself...

      ---------- Post added at 12:41 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:40 AM ----------

      JC wrote:

      Don't waste your time with anything that isn't Muay Thai, Boxing, Judo or Brazillian Jiu jitsu.


      is there any particular reason for this??
      Moustaches on strings are the finest of things :{D
    • Re: Martial Arts

      Grappling is fighting without the use of strikes.
      Fighting with grabs, throws, takedowns, trips, joint locks, chokes, etc.
      BJJ places emphasis on ground grappling, Judo places emphasis on throws.
      It's best to study 2 martial arts for self defense in my opinion.
      Boxing and BJJ, is a good combination.
      Hello JC - Cade
    • Re: Martial Arts

      I took karate for 4 full years. I almost made it to black belt but it was impossible for a person of my age and stature at the time to pass the test. So I just quit. But it was still very beneficial because I will never forget the core mechanics of karate and will always be able to execute them if necessary. The only other time you will use the black belt moves anyway is if you are fighting another black belt

      I learned how to punch almost 3 times as harder with half the energy of a normal punch, I learned how to snapback and roundhouse kick which can cause great pain if the person fails to block it, but most importantly, I learned how to block all kinds of punches and kicks before they even have the chance to reach me. It was overall a great fighting class but it was also tough. So you MUST be dedicated and put some time into it out of class too

      Post was edited 2 times, last by V1NC3 ().

    • Re: Martial Arts

      chaoticjoy1 wrote:

      Aikido, defensive offensive Japanese martial art. It works, Steven Seagal uses it.


      Shouldn't give advice about shit you have no clue about.

      Aikido is highly impractical, and Steven Seagal is an actor.
      Proven martial arts are what I mentioned.
      Why do you think most military martial arts programs are based on those? :rolleyes:

      Karate is usually highly impractical as well.
      Most of the blocks are impractical, which is why they aren't seen in MMA.
      Most styles of Karate are taught in a way that makes it so that you can only fight against other karateka, kinda like TKD.
      But, it's still better than all the other bullshit. Notable MMA fighters with a Karate background :
      GSP
      Lyoto Machida
      Hello JC - Cade
    • Re: Martial Arts

      JC wrote:

      Shouldn't give advice about shit you have no clue about.

      Aikido is highly impractical, and Steven Seagal is an actor.
      Proven martial arts are what I mentioned.
      Why do you think most military martial arts programs are based on those? :rolleyes:

      Karate is usually highly impractical as well.
      Most of the blocks are impractical, which is why they aren't seen in MMA.
      Most styles of Karate are taught in a way that makes it so that you can only fight against other karateka, kinda like TKD.
      But, it's still better than all the other bullshit. Notable MMA fighters with a Karate background :
      GSP
      Lyoto Machida


      Dont be a little slut. He is an actor. He is also a 7th degree black belt in aikido, so suck some monkey balls.
      :lolz:
    • Re: Martial Arts

      ProtoSlug wrote:

      Look into Krav Maga.


      This. I have taken muay thai, BJJ, a month or two of MMA, and Krav Maga. I couldn't get enough. It is probably the most useful of any self defense system because it is just that, a defense system. It's not a martial art, there are no rules of engagement, it teaches you how to not just fight back, but to make sure that the guy trying to hurt you can't get back up and fight. I'f you're looking for a sure way to defend yourself on the street from fists, knives, bats, or even guns, then krav is where to go.
    • Re: Martial Arts

      JC wrote:

      Shouldn't give advice about shit you have no clue about.

      Aikido is highly impractical, and Steven Seagal is an actor.
      Proven martial arts are what I mentioned.
      Why do you think most military martial arts programs are based on those? :rolleyes:

      Karate is usually highly impractical as well.
      Most of the blocks are impractical, which is why they aren't seen in MMA.
      Most styles of Karate are taught in a way that makes it so that you can only fight against other karateka, kinda like TKD.
      But, it's still better than all the other bullshit. Notable MMA fighters with a Karate background :
      GSP
      Lyoto Machida


      It's all about what you want to be able to do. Muay Thai is great for delivering fast, physically damaging blows, and wearing a fighter down over time. Judo is good for getting someone to the ground, and BJJ is good for locking someone up while they're on the ground.

      If what you want to do is go 5 rounds against a proffesionaly tranied MMA fighter, who will never let you get hold of any of his extremeties, then yes, Aikido is impractical, and muay thai and BJJ are the most effective.

      If however, what you want to be able to do is neutralize a threat without causing them too much phsyical harm, then Aikido is perfectly fine for doing that.

      If you're on the street and a drunken weight lifting baffoon decides he wants to have a go at you and your friend, being able to put him on the ground without damaging him too much and letting him know that you can break his wrist or arm if he wants to continue can sometimes be more beneficial than just being able to knock the guy unconscious with an elbow or knee to the head.

      Tae Kwon Do on the other hand, involves complex, technical leg movements and is generally a less efficient and less effective form of fighting and self defence than other martial arts, and should probably be regarded as more of a sport than a practical form of fighting.
    • Re: Martial Arts

      Try it out and see for yourself.

      Everyone should not argue about styles. They're like guns; it's how you use it. Comes down to the individual him/herself. I say each style has something worthwhile to take from. I personally practice Tiger and Crane Kung Fu.

      At my school we're taught to control a fight should it go down to the ground but never go down intentionally. In a street defense situation, you may subdue the guy you're fighting but don't forget his buddies on the side.

      Post was edited 3 times, last by Chronicler ().

    • Re: Martial Arts

      keywee wrote:

      It's all about what you want to be able to do. Muay Thai is great for delivering fast, physically damaging blows, and wearing a fighter down over time. Judo is good for getting someone to the ground, and BJJ is good for locking someone up while they're on the ground.

      If what you want to do is go 5 rounds against a proffesionaly tranied MMA fighter, who will never let you get hold of any of his extremeties, then yes, Aikido is impractical, and muay thai and BJJ are the most effective.

      If however, what you want to be able to do is neutralize a threat without causing them too much phsyical harm, then Aikido is perfectly fine for doing that.

      If you're on the street and a drunken weight lifting baffoon decides he wants to have a go at you and your friend, being able to put him on the ground without damaging him too much and letting him know that you can break his wrist or arm if he wants to continue can sometimes be more beneficial than just being able to knock the guy unconscious with an elbow or knee to the head.

      Tae Kwon Do on the other hand, involves complex, technical leg movements and is generally a less efficient and less effective form of fighting and self defence than other martial arts, and should probably be regarded as more of a sport than a practical form of fighting.


      You have a good argument, and you are absolutely right in that grappling techniques would be great for such an example.
      You are overlooking something , however.

      Aikido is very ineffective. BJJ has proven to be a better style to learn than Aikido when dealing with grappling techniques. It's not only about ground combat, it teaches various standing locks, takedowns, and throws. After all, they gotta be able to get a fight to the ground in order to win it, don't they?

      Aikido's training methods are the true question here, since last I heard, they don't let you engage in any sparring at all because the techniques are 'too dangerous'.
      They don't apply their techniques against any worthwhile resistance.
      What makes you think that what you can't even try out against someone resisting in a controlled environment (dojo) , will work against someone in the street that's out to hurt you?
      Hello JC - Cade
    • Re: Martial Arts

      I do Judo, keep that in mind while I praise it :)
      Just kidding, Judo is as good as many other martial arts, so it's up to you!
      First of all, think about whether you really enjoy martial arts or you wanna learn one just for self defence... I know you already said something about it, but you have to be sure about that!
      If you really enjoy fighting, go for Muay Thai, Kickboxing or Boxing: there's a lot of contact, and really hard blows: you can also choose Judo or BJJ if you'd rather avoid blows, but you still wanna have "real fights".
      If you're interested in self defence, Judo is also good for that, but of course Krav Maga should be your first option.
      If, otherwise, you want to learn a martial art for the sake of it, a good idea could be Karate or, well, any martial art :)
      I know, I just summed up what others already said, but JC said pretty much everything I could say... There are many other martial arts less known but very interesting: unluckly, there are few places where you can learn them properly...
      You might wanna watch the documentary "Human Weapon", where many different martial arts are explained in detail (of course, it's a tv program, so don't expect to actually learn techniques, the explainations are just for giving you an idea)..
      And, well, there's Google, there's Youtube: search for different martial arts on there, read something, watch some videos, and choose the ones you like most: search for gyms/dojos where you can learn them (usually, there's like a trial week where you can attend the lessons for free), and decide what you want to do :)
      Don't start with MMA! MMA should be chosen once you're good at some other martial arts (at least one), so that you can build your own "fighting style" based on the martial art(s) you already know!

      Avoid "mcDojos" (McDojo FAQ ;) ) and good luck :D!