How should history be taught in schools?

    • How should history be taught in schools?

      Depending on where you live, your answer may be different. I am approaching this from am American perspective, but feel free to add a perspective from your own country.

      The teaching of history is controversial in the United States, particularly when it comes to topics like race, slavery, and institutional segregation (Jim Crow). What should be taught about these topics in American public schools? At what ages? Should the negative aspects of history be toned down so students don't feel guilt?

      How were you taught history? What was memorable about what you were taught?
    • In Germany, for example, I have heard from some acquaintances there that there is no sanitization of history. Students there learn about the Holocaust and Germany's role in WWII.

      Japan is a more complicated matter; they have had trouble reckoning with their brutal activities in China during the run up to WWII.

      It's important that kids have a narrative to identify with. No one can deny the role white Americans had in oppressing black Americans. But it's also important to highlight the white Americans who opposed slavery and Jim Crow and supported Civil Rights. It's also important not to instill in minority students that they are eternal victims who can't succeed because the system is rigged against them. No untruths should be taught and facts should not be glossed over, but teaching history is more than just rattling off facts. It matters which facts are taught. It matters whom students identify with on a personal or national level.
    • I always joke with my mum I learnt more history from playing video games than I did at school (though probably true from when we watch quiz shows and I know the answer)

      It would be good to have a balanced view of history. Mostly we got taught about the World wars, Tudors, and ancient civilisations (Romans, Greeks, Egyptians)

      I only did about the troubles in Ireland (a similar discrimination area, but religious) because I took History GCSE.

      But race isn't covered in anything

      And aswell as the joint negatives we'd share (with US being our colony and the shared business) there's positives like the Mary Rose was crewed by a large variety of races (Black, Mediterranean, Arabic) all with equal respect

      Good Friend :play: Kinda Romantic :love: Ready to Rock :zomg:

      “I don’t care what they’re going to say.
      Let the storm rage on.
      The cold never bothered me anyway.”
    • I think it should be covered honestly and without hiding anything, though obviously age appropriate.

      I live in Austria and at my school, we have a field trip to a former concentration camp (Mauthausen memorial) as part of history class. That's not happening out of the blue, we're already getting prepared for it. We're going later this school year together with the year above us who couldn't go last year because of the pandemic.
      I am not sure all schools do, but my friends in a different school go as well.
    • Just talk about stuff that actually happened good or bad. Don't ignore bad stuff about someone just because it's someone that we want to look up to and on the flip side of that don't refuse to recognize someone's contributions just because they did things that wouldn't be acceptable now that were acceptable when they lived. Thomas Jefferson owned slaves but that doesn't mean we shouldn't spend a ton of time in history class recognizing his contributions to our history. There are people like Hitler or Stalin who were pure evil but in general everybody is a mix of good and bad and history should be taught with that in mind.
    • HeyCameron wrote:

      Depending on where you live, your answer may be different. I am approaching this from am American perspective, but feel free to add a perspective from your own country.

      The teaching of history is controversial in the United States, particularly when it comes to topics like race, slavery, and institutional segregation (Jim Crow). What should be taught about these topics in American public schools? At what ages? Should the negative aspects of history be toned down so students don't feel guilt?

      How were you taught history? What was memorable about what you were taught?
      I think we should learn both goods and bads, if we forget about slavery and nazis it is going to happen again